vacance, puces et…we’re back!

13 09 2010

To celebrate the new year, the end of summer, strikes in France or as the kids say, “whatever,” I took the day off and made a trek way uptown to the Whitney Museum.  Prime reason was to see the Christian Marclay exhibition and then walk back downtown to see some friends.  Well Christian’s show was nice, The Lee Friedlander exhibit shot from inside his car was terrific, and the Charles Burchfield paintings were a revelation.  Not someone I would have gone out of my way to see.  Glad I did.

Marclay’s galleries are a lot like the ARChive’s basement –rows and rows of audio–related bibelots and bilia, suggesting meaning through juxtaposition.  One nice assemblage was a rack of clothing with musical imagery + themes.  That’s a good lead-in for last weekend’s finds at an upstate flea.

Who knew Canada was the home of the Twist?  Beyond the French Twist, there’s a big CAN C&W line dance fascination with the Honky Tonk Twist, and you can practice the chorégraphe via the 600 plus videos on that u-tubby thing.

The real deal weekendwise was the Wal-feld 5000!  This children’s 78 rpm player has a Bakelite resonator/pick-up/needle holder (UK Made) on a tin tonearm, and a brightly lithographed tin body, covered with fairy tale and children’s story imagery.  I see a lot of early playback devices, and seldom are they in such perfect shape.

Wal-feld Co. Inc. was in Lynbrook, NY, and manufactured a wide range of audio related gotta-haves, including musical dolls and wooden juke boxes.  No date on my machine, but it only cost a buck to return for repairs.  Online legal notices indicate Wal-feld went bankrupt in 1965.

Another “O Canada’ flea-find was this Nov 2, 1974 George Harrison / Ravi Shankar concert program for a benefit at the Pacific Coliseum, Vancouver, British Columbia, to aid the Appalachian Regional Hospitals.  Nice artists pics, good graphics and a fine glossary of all things India, musically.

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Ladies

27 05 2010

As we get ready for our Summer Record + CD Sale a LOT of very nice folks have donated a LOT of very nice recordings.  From a-way upstate came a musty but great pile from the barn of James Dybas.  Of note are the eleven Olga Guillot LPs in pristine condition.  Grammy winning Olga was Cuba’s “Reina del bolero” – and a highly emotional one at that, most songs tearily and romantically delivered.   She sang with the quartet Siboney, began her solo career in 1945 performing at Havana’s Zombie Club, and was the first Latin artist to play Carnegie Hall!  Whata gal.

Here’s the new adds to our five-strong Olgaography:

• Bravo!!  (Musart, USA, DM 12561, 12″, vinyl disc-Lp, n.d.)
• Campanitas de Cristal  (Adria, USA, AP 3, 12″, vinyl disc-Lp, n.d.)
• Enamorada  (Adria, USA, AP 30, 12″, vinyl disc-Lp, n.d.)
• Epoca de Oro, Vol 1  (Adria, USA, AP 1, 12″, vinyl disc-Lp, n.d.)
• Gracias America  (Musart, USA, DM 1256, 12″, vinyl disc-Lp, n.d.)
• La Insuperable Olga  (Puchito, USA, MLP 580, 12″, vinyl disc-Lp     , n.d.)
• Lo Mejor de Olga Guillot  (Puchito, USA, MLP 564, 12″, vinyl disc-Lp     , n.d.)
• MAS Exitos Romanticos con Olga Guillot  (Musart, USA, DM 1060, 12″, vinyl disc-Lp, n.d.)
• Olga (Musart, USA, DM 672, 12″, vinyl disc-Lp, n.d.)
• Olga Guillot Interpreta Borinquen  (Musart, USA, DM 1384, 12″, vinyl disc-Lp, n.d.)
• Recúerdame  (Musart, USA, DM 1536, 12″, vinyl disc-Lp, n.d.)

Dean Taucher, ARC supporter and TV insider, often asks visiting celebs to sign classic LPs, then donates them to the ARC.  His latest gift includes 3 comely LPs signed by comely Ann Margaret, Sharon Stone and Isabelle Huppert.  Nice…

And since it’s Memorial Day, let’s remember…





Greil Marcus in Lipstick Traces “Live”

12 11 2009

Please join your friends at the ARChive as they present their first event up at Columbia University – Greil Marcus in Lipstick Traces: Live

Thursday, November 19, 6 pm
Free and open to the public

Altschul Auditorium, 417 International Affairs Building (SIPA), 420 West 118th Street

Lipstick Traces_flyer

In Lipstick Traces: A Secret History of the 20th Century, Greil Marcus delved into the cross-currents, tangles, and whirlpools that made such vastly different movements as dada, lettrism, the Situationist International, and punk part of a single current. To mark the just-published 20th-anniversary edition of the book, Columbia University presents Greil Marcus in a one-man performance of Lipstick Traces.

This will be smart AND fun!

A book signing will follow the event. Lipstick Traces: Live is co-sponsored by the Friends of the Columbia Libraries, the ARChive of Contemporary Music, and the Arts Initiative at Columbia University.

In addition, the Music & Arts Library at Columbia University will display books by Marcus, books that influenced him, and posters, records, and other materials courtesy of the ARChive of Contemporary Music. The exhibition will be on display from November 1 to December 15, 2009 at The Gabe M. Wiener Music & Arts Library, 7th floor of Dodge Hall, at 2960 Broadway.

Here’s a simple bibliography of Greil’s work:
* Rock & Roll Will Stand (1969), edited anthology
* Double Feature: Movies & Politics (1972), co-authored with Michael Goodwin.
* Mystery Train: Images of America in Rock ‘n’ Roll Music (E.P. Dutton & Co., New York, 1975/2008).
* Stranded: Rock and Roll for a Desert Island (1979, editor and contributor)
* Lipstick Traces: A Secret History of the 20th Century (1989/2009), a book on 20th century avant-garde art movements like Dadaism, Lettrist International and Situationist International and their influence on late 20th century countercultures and The Sex Pistols and Punk Movement.
* Dead Elvis: A Chronicle of a Cultural Obsession (1991), about the phenomenon of Elvis Presley in the years since his death
* In the Fascist Bathroom: Punk in Pop Music, 1977-1992 (1993, published in the US as Ranters and Crowd Pleasers)
* The Dustbin of History (1995)
* Invisible Republic: Bob Dylan’s Basement Tapes (1998; also published as The Old, Weird America: Bob Dylan’s Basement Tapes, 2001), an account of American folk culture, seen through Bob Dylan’s Basement Tapes.
* Double Trouble: Bill Clinton and Elvis Presley in a Land of No Alternatives (2001)
* The Manchurian Candidate (2002)
* The Rose & the Briar: Death, Love and Liberty in the American Ballad (2004, co-edited with Sean Wilentz)
* Like a Rolling Stone: Bob Dylan at the Crossroads (2005), a “biography” of the Dylan song
* The Shape of Things to Come: Prophecy in the American Voice (2006)
• A New Literary History of America (2009, with Werner Sollers, Harvard University Press)

call or e-me if you have any questions :  B. George 212-226-6967  arcmusic@inch.com=

DIRECTIONS  –  International Affairs Building (SIPA) / Altschul Auditorium

Getting to Columbia’s Campus:
The main entrances to Columbia’s campus on Morningside Heights in Manhattan are at Broadway and 116th Street (where the subway station is) and at Amsterdam Avenue and 116th Street.

Public Transportation:
The best way to reach campus is using the subway. Take subway line number 1 or 9 local to 116th Street (Columbia University) station.

Parking:
You may park on the street or use the local parking garages. The 512-520 Garage is located at the corner of 112th Street and Amsterdam; the Riverside Church Parking Garage is located on 120th Street between Claremont Avenue and Riverside Drive.

Finding Altschul Auditorium on Columbia’s Campus:
The International Affairs building (also known as SIPA) is on the eastern side of Columbia University’s Morningside Campus. The building is at 420 W. 118th Street, on the south side of 118th Street between Amsterdam Avenue and Morningside Avenue (closer to Amsterdam). Altschul Auditorium is located in the lobby of the building on the first floor, room 417.

Entering From Campus:
From the main campus entrance (right by the subway stop at 116th Street and Broadway) walk east all the way across College Walk (116th Street) to Amsterdam Avenue. Go north two blocks to 118th Street and cross Amsterdam; the International Affairs building is there on the corner. The entrance is on 118th Street (south side).





Brooklyn Baseball

30 08 2007

Well the Sox are in town, and baseball fever grips the ARC. Fred, our archivist, is star (only) softball pitcher for the “The People”, who ended the season tied for first place (MAYBE a playoff?) in the amateur Zen League last evening in Brooklyn.

So in his honor we offer this baseball flexi-disc, with Brooklyn roots, from our collection.

Baseball flexidisc

This seven-inch flexidisc features Donald Scott Drysdale, the Cy Young winner who played for the Dodgers on both coasts. Here he offers insights on the first game he ever pitched and tips for youngsters on how to prepare for the big leagues (uh, “throw fastballs”). On the back there’s a bio and stats. It’s from 1962 by Sports Champions and Auravision/Columbia Records.

Now you all have seen Ken Burn’s Baseball, and no doubt stayed to the very end to see the ARChive’s credit. Experts that we pretend to be, we’ve been amassing sports recordings for quite a while here and have a formidable collection. The Drysdale flexi is one of the many, of nearly 1000 paper records and flexi-discs, that are also sports related. To complete this story, worthy of a Zen League, this disc was given to B at the ARC by Nancy, long before either of us knew Fred, and she and Fred became an item!

For a nice online gallery visit Michael Cumella’s Internet Museum of FLEXI/CARDBOARD/ODDITY Records @ www.michaelcumella.com








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